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Fatal workplace accident statistics show increase in New Jersey

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Workplace accidents are a problem in New Jersey and across the nation. There are certain jobs that are more dangerous than others, but any job can have an incident that leads to injuries and a fatality. The statistics regarding these accidents are kept by government agencies to determine how and why they happen as well as to provide a guideline for their prevention.

According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were 97 fatal workplace accidents in 2015. That was a rise of 10 percent from 2014. Overall, there were 4,836 fatal workplace injuries across the U.S. This is an increase from 4,821 in 2014. The information that is used to accrue this data comes from state, federal and independent information. Over the years, the number of fatal accidents at work in the state were as high as 145 in 1993. In 2010, they reached a low of 81.

The fatal workplace accident breakdown included 37 fatal transportation accidents and 24 fatalities from people falling, slipping or tripping. These combined to make up 63 percent of the fatal workplace accidents in the state. Other reasons for fatalities included injuries from other people or animals at 18. That was an increase from 11 the prior year. Fatal contact with equipment or objects totaled 11. That was the same as in 2014. Private construction had the highest number of deaths at 22; 12 were because of workers falling to a lower level on the project. Private transportation had 19 fatalities; general freight trucking had 11.

There were two occupational groups that accrued the highest total of workplace deaths. 15 motor vehicle operators died. Construction trade workers made up 14 of the 21 deaths for construction/extraction employees. 98 percent of the work-related deaths in New Jersey were men. That is in comparison to 93 percent of males dying on the job across the U.S. White people accounted for 54 percent of the deaths; nationwide whites came to 67 percent. People 55 and older were 40 percent of the deaths; nationwide, they came to 35 percent. 86 percent of the people who died in New Jersey worked for wages and salaries with the rest being self-employed.

These statistics can be useful when there is a fatal workplace accident and the family that has suffered the loss of a loved one is considering a legal filing for compensation. A lawyer who is experienced in wrongful death claims can be helpful with cobbling together the evidence and pursuing a case regardless of the work that was being done at the time of death.

Source: insurancejournal.com, "BLS Report Finds New Jersey Fatal Work Injuries Increased in 2015," March 23, 2017

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