Robert A. Solomon, P.C.
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You can seek compensation for medication interactions

When you take a number of medications to control illnesses and diseases, there's a potential for interactions. Medications have the potential to cause patients many side effects. Some medications interact negatively, so they should be avoided when they can and alternatives should be used.

One-fifth of older Americans are receiving medications that could adversely affect their coexisting conditions, based on information from research at Oregon State University and the Yale University School of Medicine. One co-author of the study claims that over 9 million older adults are prescribed medications that could be hurting them more than benefiting them.

The study looked at 14 medical conditions that primarily affect those over the age of 65. These include heart disease, hypertension, arthritis and others. Doctors tend to treat conditions one at a time, so the medications used can conflict. For example, someone with high blood pressure who is given albuterol for asthma may benefit from the opening of the airways but suffer from unusually high blood pressure due to side effects. Those with heart disease are put on beta blockers, but these can make a disease like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease worse.

In most cases, you'd think that if the conflict was discovered, the drugs would be stopped. It was found that was not true in most cases; in fact, only 16 percent of cases where physicians found competing drug issues resulted in changes to medication orders.

Our website has more information about medical malpractice and what to do if you've been affected. You have rights as a patient, and a doctor's errors should be accounted for.

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